Summer Yoga, Engaging the Community

Since June 2019, YWCA Cambridge has offered free summer yoga classes to members of our community. This opportunity is funded by a Cambridge in Motion mini grant awarded  to projects that engage their community in healthy lifestyles. 

This project actually started last year at  Tanner Residence, our affordable housing for women. Funding allowed us to provide our residents  with monthly yoga and healthy eating classes. Residents enjoyed the experience so much that we thought it made sense  to open up this opportunity to the community at large. 

One of the goals of this project  is to break down the financial barriers that often exist around programs focused on health and active living. For many people, paying for a gym membership or yoga classes simply is not in the budget. YWCA Cambridge believes in breaking down these financial barriers to give everyone an equal opportunity to thrive. The free yoga classes are an example of how we carry out that belief. It is important that in every community there are opportunities like this one that give people the chance to get active and try new things, at  no cost.

The class is held every other Wednesday at noon and taught by the wonderful Malika Ms. Bonafide. Participants enjoy a one hour class that is geared towards beginners and those looking for a middle of the day respite. One participant said, “Summer yoga at the YW is the perfect escape and release for the middle of the day. The instructor is inspirational and invites us into our best practice. I always leave feeling refreshed and renewed. Thanks for offering this wonderful experience!”. Getting to participate in and observe the class myself has been a wonderful experience, and it has been a joy seeing women in our community partaking in the class together. 

By: Kate Fulton-John
YWCA Administrative Intern, Forest Foundation

The Girls of GOLD

The first weekend in May, GOLD (Girls Only Leadership Development), a partnership program between Councilor E. Denise Simmons and the YWCA Cambridge, hosted a day long summit, Beyond All Limits, for 7th, 8th, and 9th grade girls in the Somerville and Cambridge area. The summit focused on leadership skills, self identity and expression, and meaningful career paths. I had the privilege of moderating the panel with local women who built their own careers and are paving the way for future women leaders in their field.

Maybe you are thinking – these girls are only in 7th, 8th, or 9th grade why do they need to think about careers now?

The women on the Beyond All Limits panel were diverse: a health and wellness entrepreneur, a software engineer, a poet-rapper-educator, and a photographer. Each of these women spoke about how they held onto their self expression and creativity, followed their passion, and practiced self awareness throughout their career journey. These are all values that GOLD holds and strives to uphold with the girls. As described by the panelists, it can be incredibly challenging to take on a nontraditional career path and especially difficult to feel empowered to begin this journey, whether it’s starting a business doing healing yoga or being one of the few women majoring in computer science.


Why invest in girls?

Empowering women and eliminating racism is the mission of YWCA Cambridge and it must start at a young age. Investing time and energy in these middle school girls is crucial for self empowerment, self expression and self esteem. GOLD aims to create a safe space for girls to talk about their self identity, practice leadership skills, and learn in an inter-generational space. Creating these kinds of spaces for girls builds up their self worth and helps them develop community support. Through the GOLD program, this support is cultivated not only with their peers but also with women in the Cambridge community. These spaces and this community of support empowers the girls to create their own career path and follow their authentic self.

Investing in girls breaks down barriers of inequality.

You can’t be what you don’t see – having women role models for these girls inspires them to engage in activities and to explore paths that they may not have thought of before. Strong women inspire strong GOLD girls.

Written by: Elizabeth Baldwin, YWCA Board Member and Chair of the Racial Justice Committee

My Time as a YWCA Cambridge Intern

by Serina Matthew, CCSC Senior, YWCA Cambridge Intern

My name is Serina Matthew and I have been an intern at YWCA Cambridge for the last few months. I am a Senior at Community Charter School of Cambridge. One of our requirements is to complete 100 hours of community service for an organization over 14 weeks. With the help of Whitney Mooney, my supervisor and  YWCA Fund Development Manager, I have learned a lot about nonprofit organizations since my start in January 2019.

Over the 14 weeks, I have had the chance to learn about event planning and fundraising for a nonprofit. We may all think that event planning is not a difficult task but it is when you have to find catering and a space that is within your small budget. YWCA has held multiple events since I have been here. Starting with events to help the residents with their credit and ending with Trailblazing Women, an event that highlights key women figures in the community. When planning these events the first thing is advertisement and that’s where I came in. For many of the events that happened over the last 5 months, I had to use my creative skills to create flyers that appealed to residents and community members. From there, I hung the flyers around the building and surrounding area coffee shops.

After advertising, it’s time to prepare the the logistics and details for the event. For Trailblazing Women,  there were folders that provided information about the community conversation and the women that were being celebrated. Along with preparing folders I also helped with creating name tags for the event speakers which helps set them apart from the audience.

Event planning has many small tedious tasks that help to make an event look professional and put together.  It is important for nonprofits to get their name out into the community and showcase the work they are doing. Making a name for the organization  in the community is important because it drives new volunteers and donors. People become invested in your mission. For example many people come into YWCA Cambridge looking for the swimming pool or exercise equipment. Throughout these moments, I realized many people think that the YWCA is the YMCA.  

I have learned that this nonprofit organization is determined to help young women be empowered to live and work in this predominantly male led world. YWCA is the most caring organization that I know in Cambridge because of what they provide for low income women and children, from Girls Only Leadership Development to safe, affordable housing at the Tanner Residence.

Through this time at YWCA Cambridge, I have gained a multitude of skills that I will take with me to college and beyond. I have learned how to professionally answer phones and guide customers. Along with my customer service skills I have gained the basic necessities of working in an office. I believe this is the most important skill to take away because in the future I will have a job or an internship that will require office experience.

YWCA Cambridge is dedicated to eliminating racism, empowering women and promoting peace, justice, freedom and dignity for all. Through this experience I have felt empowered to grow as a future business professional and a conscious citizen.

Whitney Mooney, supervisor, and Serina Matthew, YWCA Cambridge intern

Immigration Justice is Racial Justice

Every year, YWCA USA organizes a nationwide campaign called “Stand Against Racism”. This campaign includes advocacy events, education PSAs, social media conversations, and so much more. This year, YWCA USA invited its local associations to host community activities designed to facilitate dialogue around the topic of immigration. YWCA chose this focus for its 2019 Stand Against Racism campaign because of the intimate relationship between immigrant justice and racial justice, a core mission of YWCA USA and its local associations. Throughout our nation’s history, and particularly in recent years, narratives around immigration have been shaped by an undercurrent of fear, hate, and ignorance. Negative stereotypes and scapegoating too often prevent us from imagining the immigrant–regardless of status–as a human being deserving of safety, health, respect, and dignity. Until the humanity of immigrants, refugees, and asylum seekers is recognized and honored, true justice remains elusive. As Emma Lazarus wrote long ago, “Until we are all free, we are none of us free.”

On April 27, 2019, YWCA Cambridge hosted “Refugee Resettlement in MA: Know the Facts” featuring speakers from outstanding organizations like the Refugee and Immigration Assistance Center (RIAC) Boston and the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy (MIRA) Coalition. Organizations like these and many others in the Boston/Cambridge area are doing the critical on-the-ground work of welcoming and supporting individuals and families who have come to the United States as immigrants, refugees, or asylum seekers, many of whom have endured years in unsafe or volatile environments while they applied for resettlement (many wait five or more years in this process.) The challenges facing immigrants and refugees continue upon arrival in the United States, as they are faced with tight labor markets, expensive housing costs, tangled bureaucratic systems, and unfamiliar social and cultural norms and practices.

Elevating marginalized voices like those of immigrants and refugees is central to the mission of the YWCA Cambridge. At our Stand Against Racism event this year, the YWCA Cambridge had the privilege of learning from those who have themselves gone through the process of seeking refugee status in the United States and who now devote their lives to supporting other immigrants and refugees.

Organizations like the ones listed below advocate for issues affecting this population and provide assistance in navigating this complex environment. Check out the following ways you can get involved!

Enroot’s mission is to empower immigrant youth to achieve academic, career, and personal success through inspiring out-of-school experiences. As a volunteer with Enroot, you can be matched with a student to be a mentor or a tutor. As a mentor, you are a role model, adviser, friend, and guide helping your mentee to dream big, set goals, and pursue them. All mentees in the Enroot Program are immigrant high school students in Cambridge and Somerville. Some pairs meet each week at Enroot’s office for structured activities, while others meet once a week to work on college applications at a local coffee shop. As a tutor, you are a one-on-one academic resource for an immigrant high school student in our Enroot Program. Tutees are all immigrant high school students in Cambridge and Somerville. Tutors help with homework, language skills, and study skills. Lean more here.

MIRA is the largest coalition in New England promoting the rights and integration of immigrants and refugees. With offices in Massachusetts and New Hampshire, they advance this mission through education and training, leadership development, institutional organizing, strategic communications, policy analysis and advocacy. Volunteers are crucial to much of their work, particularly citizenship services, voter registration, communications and events. They’re also grateful for behind-the-scenes help with data entry and other much-needed tasks. Or if you might be willing to staff a MIRA table at a community festival or event, they are setting up a team to do that! If you’re interested in any of those options, or you’re an artist or photographer, please email Marion Davis at mdavis@miracoalition.org to volunteer! Want to help immigrants become U.S. citizens or register new citizens to vote? They host monthly naturalization clinics and register newly sworn-in U.S. citizens almost every week. Sign up to volunteer on our Facebook page or at miracoalition.eventbrite.com.  Click here to learn more.

RIAC’s mission is to promote cultural, educational, and socioeconomic development in the refugee and immigrant community. To realize our mission, RIAC offers the following range of services to support successful resettlement and to promote self-sufficiency: Refugee Resettlement, Post-Resettlement Support Service, Community Education & Outreach, Counseling Services. RIAC is always looking for front desk volunteers, help with community events, translation services, and so much more.
Learn more here.

De Novo’s mission is to provides free civil legal assistance and affordable psychological counseling to low-income people. Our services combat the effects of poverty and violence by helping clients and their children meet basic human needs for safety, income, health and housing. De Novo draws on the expertise of 130 dedicated volunteer professionals to serve our community’s most vulnerable members. De Novo is always looking for volunteers for administrative tasks, the counselling program, and legal services. Learn more here.

Written by: Whitney Mooney, Fund Development Manager & Emily Irving, Board Member

Tanner Residence, a Safe, Affordable Home for Single Women

LeNay Harper
Director of Housing and Shelter Services

No matter how you think about it, the one thing no one ever wants to be is homeless.

Without a roof (permanent or temporary) over your head, without a bed to sleep in, and without a  place you can come to at the end of your day, lock your door, and feel safe, the world can be a scary place in which to live. Not all, but many of the residents at the YWCA Cambridge’s Tanner Residence have experienced long term homelessness. They have known that feeling of being invisible – where no one wants to acknowledge, speak to, or even provide you with any assistance. Tanner Residence is a respite from that sense of not belonging. A place of welcome for all.

YWCA Cambridge offers 103 units of Single Room Occupancy (SRO) housing at the Tanner Residence with a number of different payment options. Some of our rooms are private pay, market rate; others are set aside for specific service providers, and yet other rooms are available through Cambridge Housing Authority’s Mobile Resource Voucher Program (MRVP) or Section 8 vouchers. Regardless of how women arrive at Tanner Residence or what payment arrangement meets their individual needs, each has her own room with access to shared bathroom, kitchen and laundry facilities, and to a large ground floor community room as well as to smaller community rooms located throughout the building.

YWCA Cambridge’s Director of Housing & Shelter Services provides supportive services to our residents through assistance identifying and engaging community resources and referrals, advocacy, housing searches, crisis intervention and much more. She also coordinates educational and informational workshops and meetings, wellness activities and social events. Tanner Residence is a non-smoking, elevator accessible building with 24-hour staffing. A beautifully landscaped outdoor area is available for the residents to enjoy, weather permitting.

Agency and service provider representatives are invited to share information and resources with our residents and to offer assistance in areas such as job preparedness, life skills training, credit repair and other services in Cambridge and the surrounding area..

Whether our residents wish to continue living at YWCA Cambridge’s Tanner Residence or move into accommodations elsewhere, our goal is to help provide the necessary tools that will enable them to live long-term in safe, affordable housing, while using their voices to advocate successfully for themselves.

Reflections on Youth Empowerment

Theodora Skeadas
YWCA Cambridge Board of Trustees

YWCA Cambridge is dedicated to eliminating racism, empowering women, and promoting peace, justice, freedom, and dignity. These have always been passions of mine. After college, my passion for combating discrimination, the promotion of youth and women’s empowerment, and conflict resolution led me to work and study in Morocco, Turkey, and Iraq. 

In Morocco, I worked for the Sidi Moumen Cultural Center, where I managed a community development project that provided programming on theater, music, and athletics to Moroccan Arabic-speaking women and youth.

While working with Search for Common Ground’s Morocco office, I helped lead a multimedia and intercultural relations program in Casablanca. The project consisted of training French and English-speaking Sub-Saharan migrant women and Arabic-speaking young Moroccan mothers to produce films, documentaries, and advertisements dealing with intercultural relations. We also held discussions on the various forms of discrimination the women encountered, to empower and build relationships amongst our participants, and to break down cultural stereotypes and prejudices.  

I then sought to undertake a Fulbright grant in Turkey, in part, because I desired to leverage my English teaching skills and knowledge of the region and culture in service of Turkish students eager to learn English. Further, as part of my fellowship, I researched the barriers to employment for Syrian refugee youth in southeastern Turkey and Iraqi Kurdistan through interviews in Turkish and Arabic, reading, and travel.

My experiences around anti-racism, women’s and youth empowerment, and conflict resolution in the Middle East and North Africa were tremendously meaningful to me.

Today, I am thrilled to be supporting these initiatives through the YWCA Cambridge! I serve as the Clerk on our Board of Trustees, and I have helped support our efforts around the annual Tribute to Outstanding Women, an event where we recognize resilient women who work to eliminate racism and empower other women, and we thank them for their commitment to our local community. Further, as a member of the Governance Committee, I help the Board increase its efficiency, and ultimately improve the effectiveness of the YWCA Cambridge in delivering meaningful services and programming to our constituents.

Theo 1
Conducting research in Erbil, Iraq; November 1, 2013

Theo 2
Theo and her students in Antalya, Turkey;  December 23, 2013

36225075_10156242597056125_4647888379369750528_o
Board Members, Theo, Jennifer, and Emily; June 25, 2018

Why I Vote: A Letter to My Sister

My younger sister asked me the other day, “Why are you so obsessed with voting and getting people registered to vote?”

To give you some backstory… I have been pretty adamant in the last two years about discussing politics, encouraging friends to register to vote, getting involved with organizations, and going to the polls no matter if its presidential, midterm, or local elections. I have become “the crazy voting lady”; but that is okay.

After getting off the phone with my sister, I mulled over the conversation. How do I explain my passion to her and her friends who really don’t care much about elections, let alone politics? How do I verbalize something that I consider to be so extremely vital?

Upon reflecting, I developed a list of reasons voting in elections is so essential to me.

  1. It took until June 26, 2015 for my LGBTQ+ friend’s marriages to be federally recognized. I remember being so elated but also so mad that it took this long for something as simple as love to be recognized in the eyes of the government.
  2. When I was in high school, my mom was unemployed and on food stamps but it wasn’t enough to feed her, my sister, and I. It was barely enough to pay for the rent and a few meals. The government has unrealistic ideas of living wages.
  3. Some of my friends who went to school for Associate degrees don’t make a living wage of $15/hour but have thousands of dollars in student loan debt.
  4. When I was in college, my dad was still unemployed from the recession. Since I was in college, I was no longer covered under state insurance and my college insurance rates were too expensive for me to cover since I only made $7.75/hour for 10-15 hours a week. I was uninsured and scared of every possible illness. Getting a cold was terrifying. “What if it escalated? I can’t go to urgent care. I don’t have $150 to cover this.” It was three months, but man those were three very stressful months.
  5. During the recession, my dad and mom’s medications cost so much without insurance that they had to pick and choose which ones were essential on a given month.
  6. It’s 2018 and my co-workers and friends of color are still scared to get pulled over by the police, because in the current climate, getting pulled over for a broken tail light has lead to death at the hands of those who serve.
  7. My monthly student loan payment is more than my monthly rent payment.
  8. Women are still afraid to speak up because even when a man does something that violates a woman he is welcomed with open arms by the highest law making entity in the United States or told his future is “too bright” for him to serve time in jail.
  9. Our criminal justice system is broken. It is broken beyond repair. Men and women of color in disproportionate numbers go to jail because they can’t pay traffic fines or for minor drug charges. This becomes an easy way for the government to fully discriminate against them for housing, government aid, jobs, and most importantly – takes away their voice and ability to make a difference, by not allowing them to vote.  
  10. If we aren’t voting for people who care about these dire issues, we will never see real change. Change happens on the floor of the House and the Senate. It happens when the right people are in office.

To my dear sister: I vote, because I want you to HAVE a future, a voice, a choice. I want you to matter. I want you to thrive in a country that believes everyone is equal. I believe that every vote is a step in that direction. Every vote counts. Your voice matters.

Written by: Whitney Mooney, Administrative Assistant 

syd
My sister and I on her high school graduation day.